Financial Data

Windham School District is funded through appropriations to the Texas Education Agency and must earn these funds according to formulas set by law. Sources of WSD revenue include state, federal, and other funds. State funds are appropriations from the Foundation School Program and General Revenue (TDCJ). Federal funds are provided through grants such as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I-Part D-Subpart I, Title II-Part B, Title IV, and Title VI. Federal grants are also provided through Carl Perkin’s Vocational Criminal Offender, Workplace & Community Transition Youthful Offender, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Local funds consist of interest income and miscellaneous sources. Windham provides college administration and recreation programs to all units through Memorandums of Understanding with the TDCJ.

 

Superintendent

Human Resources

      Salaries

Business and Administration

      Purchasing

      Budget and Salary Schedules

     Salaries

      Payments and Vendors

Information Technology

Instruction

Operational Support

Success Stories

Success Story IconNEW - Tools to change my own life - "What can I say about Autobrakes? I guess I need to start by saying it's one of the best classes I have ever taken!"

Success Story IconNEW - I’m so grateful I took welding -
"I’m so grateful I took welding; I’ve come so far in my career because the things I was taught in that program".

Success Story IconInspiration Success Story -
"You are inspiring people you haven’t even met!"

Success Story IconPolunsky Unit Success Story -
"He [Mr. Leblanc] taught me things that even the guys rebuilding transmissions for many years didn't know."

Calendar

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Teach for WSD

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WSD in Images

Offenders often experience academic success for the first time in a Windham classroom.
Female offenders in Gatesville, Texas, study to improve their literacy skills during a WSD academic class.
Vocational and academic skills are integrated in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, such as this Small Engine Repair class in Huntsville, Texas.
Auto specialization students in a West Texas prison learn auto maintenance skills, preparing themselves for future employment as professional mechanics.
Each day WSD correctional educators pass through prison gates across Texas to work with men and women incarcerated within TDCJ.
WSD’s Business and Image Management & Multimedia (BIMM) class offers students the opportunity to learn viable graphic arts and computer skills, helping them prepare for jobs after release.