History

The WSD was established by the Texas Board of Corrections in October 1969, as authorized by the Texas Legislature, to provide educational opportunities to offenders incarcerated in state prisons. WSD was named after James M. Windham, who served on the Texas Board of Corrections for 24 years.

 James M. Windham

The WSD began with a staff of eight instructors and grew along with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ). Today the WSD is one of the largest correctional education systems in the nation, offering a variety of literacy, life skills, vocational and post-secondary classes to eligible offenders incarcerated in the Correctional Institutions Division of the TDCJ.

 

 

Success Stories

Success Story IconTo a WSD welding teacher from a former offender student -
"I got a job welding and I had to write and just thank you so much for putting me ahead of the game."

Success Story IconEducation changed my life -
"These opportunities [GED® classes or learning a trade] are great, but WSD is so much more than that; for me it was a change of life."

Success Story IconFormer Windham student becomes successful electrician -
Garrett Stanley, a wonderful story of success in life after incarceration.

Success Story IconNEW - Better future after prison - "It's mind-blowing and inspirational to know that you can have a better future after prison"

Calendar

August 2018
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31

Teach for WSD

jobview sidebar

WSD in Images

Students at the Huntsville “Walls” Unit strengthen writing skills during a literacy class.
Vocational and academic skills are integrated in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, such as this Small Engine Repair class in Huntsville, Texas.
Female offenders in Gatesville, Texas, study to improve their literacy skills during a WSD academic class.
Auto specialization students in a West Texas prison learn auto maintenance skills, preparing themselves for future employment as professional mechanics.
Each day WSD correctional educators pass through prison gates across Texas to work with men and women incarcerated within TDCJ.
Texas State Board of Education Chair Barbara Cargill congratulates GED recipients during Spring, 2014, ceremonies. “I am very impressed with the program and with the commitment of the staff and teachers,” she said.

Former Student Survey