TDCJ Public Information Office - Austin woman receives 2013 Governor’s Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award

TDCJ Public Information Office, April 5, 2013

Judith Dullnig - 2013 Governor's Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award

Judith Dullnig - 2013 Governor's Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award

This honor (Governor's Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award) is referred to as the Judy Burd Award in memory of Judy Burd, WSD volunteer coordinator and lifelong educator. Pictured from left to right is Connie McMurrey, WSD representative; recipient Judith Dullnig and WSD Division of Instruction Director Veronica Casanova.

Read the Release


(AUSTIN) – Judith Dullnig was presented the Governor's 2013 Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award today in recognition of her dedication to helping offenders incarcerated within the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

The award was presented by Texas Board of Criminal Justice Vice Chairman Tom Mechler and Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) Executive Director Brad Livingston during a ceremony held in Austin. Dullnig is one of 20 recipients from across Texas recognized for their efforts to help state offenders and those who are on parole or probation.

"Each of this year's award recipients personify a selfless dedication to helping offenders succeed both while incarcerated, and once they're released," said Livingston.

Dullnig, an approved volunteer for more than nine years, facilitates the Women's Storybook Project of Texas at six female units in cooperation with the Windham School District (WSD). The program allows incarcerated mothers to share a recording of themselves and a book with their child. The mother reads the book as though she is reading to the child and is allowed to write a personal note inside the cover of the book. The tape and book are then mailed to the child. This program allows incarcerated moms to bond or keep an established bond with their child or children while in prison.

Dullnig's Award is names the WSD Judy Burd Award in memory of Judy Burd, an educational volunteer coordinator and lifelong educator. Dullnig is one of thousands of concerned volunteers who donate many hours of their personal time every year with the goal of changing the lives of convicted offenders, and aiding and comforting their victims. Annually, approximately 18,000 volunteers make 163,000 visits to criminal justice facilities and work with offenders who are on supervision, donating over 526,000 hours of service.


Other articles that may interest you:

Campbell Concrete visits Polunksy Unit, tours Windham School District CTE programs - Campbell Concrete of Houston recently toured the Windham School District Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs at the Polunsky Unit in Livingston. TDCJ’s Manufacturing, Agribusiness and Logistics Division also participated, offering information on ways WSD and TDCJ partner to prepare offenders for future employment.

Building the Workforce: Correctional educators from Windham School District  sign collaboration agreement with Gulf Coast Workforce Board,  affiliate of Workforce Solutions

Career Expo business presentation empowers former offender to succeed - When former offender Peter Delfs returned to prison to give a presentation at a Career Expo at Dominguez State Jail, he experienced a rewarding role reversal. Released from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) in early 2015, Delfs was in the offender audience at Dominguez State Jail when the 2014 Career Expo was held. Then he returned as a guest speaker.

WSD receives support from NCCER with efforts to connect trained offenders and employers - Windham School District vocational training programs are certified by the nationally-recognized National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) Industrial Certification Verification program. This program is widely recognized in industry as a leading certification endorsement for the construction and manufacturing trades. 

Former inmate beats the odds, gets degree - "I'm doing this for one big reason, to glorify God, he did all of this for me. I put my effort into it but he walked me through it, through it all," said Pereida.

Success Stories

Success Story IconPolunsky Unit Success Story -
"He [Mr. Leblanc] taught me things that even the guys rebuilding transmissions for many years didn't know."

Success Story IconNEW - I can now make a living. I’m free - "The welding program helped me build character. Mr. Perry taught me how to talk like a welder..."

Success Story IconNEW - After more than 16 years - "I graduated from the electrical program in 1998. I found my Windham teachers were real people, and they..."

Success Story IconNEW - I’m so grateful I took welding -
"I’m so grateful I took welding; I’ve come so far in my career because the things I was taught in that program".


March 2018
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Teach for WSD

jobview sidebar

WSD in Images

Offenders often experience academic success for the first time in a Windham classroom.
Offenders often experience academic success for the first time in a Windham classroom.
Each day WSD correctional educators pass through prison gates across Texas to work with men and women incarcerated within TDCJ.
Vocational and academic skills are integrated in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, such as this Small Engine Repair class in Huntsville, Texas.
An offender at the Polunsky Unit prepares for graduation after earning his GED through the Windham School District.
Female offenders in Gatesville, Texas, study to improve their literacy skills during a WSD academic class.