HUNTSVILLE ITEM: TDCJ’s Windham School District: Safe, successful stories being told here now

By Winston Spencer Jr.

Posted: 08/02/2014 9:44 PM

 

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Time heals all wounds, or so it’s been said. Some say time covers wounds with scar tissue. The pain lessens, but it’s never truly gone.

Forty years have passed since the world shared the city of Huntsville’s wounds caused by the senseless losses of Julia “Judy” Standley and Elizabeth “Von” Beseda, employees at the Texas Department of Corrections.

What have we learned as a result of those tragic events? What’s it like to teach inside prison walls in Texas today?

“Today we provide security training to all Texas Department of Criminal Justice new hires,” said Veronica Casanova, director of instruction for the Windham School District, TDCJ’s school system for its offender population.

“We get a minimum 12 hours per year of security training. Most of our staff gets far more than that, but everyone gets at a minimum those 12 hours. The training we receive as part of the Windham staff is tailored to  fit our specific needs.”

Those particular training needs are designed to help teachers maintain a high level of awareness of the culture of their surroundings, so they can identify levels of threats and most of all, remember where they work.

During the 11-day siege that began on July 24, 1974, inmates seized the education and library areas inside the Huntsville “Walls” Unit. Three armed convicts captured 11 employees along with five inmates. The convicts then negotiated their own release while threatening to execute the hostages.

When the inmates planned to use the hostages as human shields, Standley and Beseda volunteered to take the most dangerous positions — in front. They died when they were shot by their captors.

On Aug. 26, 1999, 25 years after the violent ending of the siege, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice formally named the Standley-Beseda Education Facility after the fallen educators.

Today, Windham officials say Standley and Beseda live on in every educator who endeavors to make the effort to change the lives of offenders. The facility in the “Walls” serves as a constant reminder of their legacy and sacrifice.

Casanova, who spent 20 years teaching in the public school system, feels “more secure” within the correctional classroom than she did in the public sector.

“I think I can speak for many of our instructors when I say we feel more secure in our setting than we did in our former classrooms,” Casanova said last week. “Part of it I know is because of the training we receive. (However) we are taught to engage the inmate with instruction and that keeps everyone focused on the goal.

“From the time our teachers come here they learn about the history here, and other teachers and staff lend a hand with their experience to give better perspective.”

Before coming to Windham District, Casanova had her concerns.

“I asked questions, I sat in on a correctional class and talked with teachers, all to make sure this was the right place for me,” she said. “I was transitioning from elementary school to men. What I found was that here, we have to be a team. We have a very positive team; it’s a great team effort here.”

Casanova says Windham teachers enjoy being a part of the many successful stories inside the district that was knocked to its knees on this date 40 years ago.

“We are able to see success much more than many of us did in the public sector,” Casanova said. “Many of these inmates are experiencing academic success for the first time ever in their lives,. Dreams are established.”

Casanova has a few suggestions for the public school system, as well.

“First, regardless of the subject or its content, we (teachers and administrators) must engage students to think — critically. Secondly, we have to develop partnerships between schools, family, students and industry.

“Huntsville is not so big that this can’t become a realistic goal.”

 

Other articles that may interest you:

Livingston graduation ceremony: Rep. James White joins WSD in marking success - Two special guests celebrated academic achievement during a recent WSD graduation ceremony at the Polunsky Unit in Livingston, Texas. Representative James White was in attendance to offer personal congratulations and present each graduate with a certificate of achievement.

'We are Windham' video proudly explains why, how WSD changes lives. Now available online. - "We are Windham. We are ready for change. We are second chances for men and women formerly incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. We change our society." So begins "We are Windham," a recruitment and informational video created by WSD explaining why Windham focuses on helping offenders across Texas become job-ready and change their lives for success upon release.

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Quick Facts School Year 2016 - WSD’s Vision, Mission, Goals and Partnerships, along with a brief summary of SY 2016 highlights.

Message to WSD employees:
State Employee Charitable Campaign (SECC) 2017: NOW – Oct. 31!

Together We Can! - secctexas.orgOnce again Windham School District is privileged to support the State Employee Charitable Campaign (SECC), allowing employees to make donations to eligible charities of their choice. Employees at every campus have the option to participate, and WSD is proud of the legacy employees promote through caring for others.

The Windham School District raised $22,314 statewide last year for SECC, topping the 2015 total of $20, 470.
This year's WSD goal is $24,800!

If you are on a unit, you will need to turn in your SECC contribution, cash or payroll deduction (the easiest way!) ASAP to the school office or WSD designee. Donations will then be sent to Dina Valenta in the WSD Administration Business Office and become part of the WSD campaign total. Charity choices and codes are found in the SECC booklets at each school site or go to http://www.secctexas.org/. Forms should also be available at your work site.

SECC Silent Auction winner Marlise Golden celebrates her winnings and the opportunity to help others in need.

SECC Silent Auction winner Marlise Golden celebrates her winnings and the opportunity to help others in need.

If you are in the WSD administration offices, please visit the Superintendent's Office to make your gift to the charity or charities of your choice! Donations may be made with checks, cash or payroll deduction (the easiest way!). In addition, WSD Administration's Annual SECC Silent Auction is scheduled for Oct. 5 in Huntsville (10 a.m. – 2 p.m. ) All employees and WSD friends are welcome to participate, and the auction features hundreds of items in a wide variety of values. Unit and school fundraisers may also involve silent auctions, bake sales, food sales and other events. Everyone is encouraged to also enjoy participating in SECC events held by TDCJ and other agencies.

For the third year, WSD fundraising for SECC will include the sale of official WSD shirts and jackets to school district employees. New items will be hoodies and unit vests/aprons. Proceeds will go to designated SECC charities. More details regarding shirt orders and will be emailed to employees in mid-September.


How do WSD employees help us meet the overall WSD fundraising goal?

  1. Make a cash, check or payroll deduction donation at your job site.
  2. Order a new WSD shirt or hoodie (profits to SECC!) –or a few! – Details to be announced soon!
  3. Participate in WSD fund-raising activities at your site for SECC.
  4. Enjoy the privilege of helping others in need!

SECC Silent Auction bidder Melinda Cobb bids on special items while supporting her favorite charities.

SECC Silent Auction bidder Melinda Cobb bids on special items while supporting her favorite charities.

Unit employees should be sure their donations are sent to Dina Valenta in the WSD Business Office in Huntsville, preferably as a campus group.
Do not use truck mail. Please hand deliver or use U.S. Post Office (campus donations need to be sent through the registered mail with tracking number; do not send cash through the regular or truck mail).

Your participation and donations are appreciated! Please join us in helping make a difference in many lives!