TDCJ Public Information Office - Manvel Woman receives 2012 Governor's Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award

TDCJ Public Information Office, April 19, 2012

(AUSTIN) - Carolyne Fox of Manvel was presented the Governor's 2012 Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award today in recognition of her dedication in helping offenders incarcerated within the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. See link below.


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MANVEL WOMAN RECEIVES GOVERNOR'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD

(AUSTIN) – Carolyne Fox of Manvel was presented the Governor's 2012 Criminal Justice Volunteer Service Award today in recognition of her dedication in helping offenders incarcerated within the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

The award was presented by Texas Board of Criminal Justice Chairman Oliver Bell and TDCJ Executive Director Brad Livingston today during a ceremony held in Austin. Fox is one of 13 individuals and 6 organizations from across the state recognized for their efforts to help offenders and those who are on parole or probation.

"Each of this year's award recipients personify a selfless dedication to helping offenders succeed both while incarcerated, and once they're released," said Livingston.

Fox was the recipient of the "Judy Burd" Award. This award is named in tribute to curriculum specialist, Judy Burd, who was employed with the Windham School District where she developed the nationally recognized pre-release program CHANGES. She was also the WSD Volunteer Program Coordinator and, in that capacity, encouraged many to give of their time in service to others.

To help offenders reach their educational potential, Carolyne Fox has been volunteering an average of two days a week at the Ramsey Unit since January 2011. During her numerous visits, she has volunteered over 200 hours of her time to impact the lives of offenders whose literacy skills are below the national average. Ms. Fox patiently works with each student, helping them and encouraging them in their learning experience. She demonstrates through her positive attitude and selflessness that education is an important aspect of rehabilitation. Ms. Fox is not just teaching them "reading, writing, and arithmetic," she is teaching them how to live life.

Fox received her undergraduate degree from Bryn Mawr College and graduate degree from Syracuse University. She and her husband, George, have two children and three grandchildren.

Fox is one of thousands of concerned volunteers, who like her, donate many hours of their personal time every year with the goal of changing the lives of convicted offenders, and aiding and comforting their victims. Annually, over 18,000 volunteers make 163,000 visits to criminal justice facilities and work with offenders who are on supervision, donating over 526,000 hours of service.

 

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