Telford Unit offenders change thinking patterns

By WSD Teacher Pam Patterson

Telford Unit offenders change thinking patterns

The U.S. military has advertised that they are looking for "a few good men." The saying insinuates that there are many who may answer the call to be proud, brave and courageous in the face of fire; however, there are only a few out of the many that will continue to stand undeterred under the breath of adversity. Telford unit offenders quoteLike this saying, there are only a few that have stood through months of hard testing and come out victorious for a notable cause: the freedom to choose right thinking and right behavior. Windham School District's Cognitive Intervention program at the Barry Telford Unit in New Boston graduated a "few good men" recently.   Some may not know that at the Telford Unit offenders designated as G-4s are able to attend a Cognitive Intervention class. G-4 offenders are not typically the best behaved offenders. A typical class may begin with 20 stalwart G-4 young men who are ready to change, ready to leave the past behind, and ready to make permanent changes to incorrect thinking patterns. They want to prevent a life of perpetual missteps. At the end of months of lockdowns, building turmoil, and day and day encounters with officers or other offenders, the members begin to drop like petals from a flower. Some believed they could be successful by riding the fence and the winds of true change blew them back to where they began. Although those that remained struggled through personal challenges, they stayed their course and they finished this part of their journey. It is hoped they will continue on to personal freedom by using their endowed gift of personal choice to remain free.

 One of the last classes to graduate went from 20 students to 10 students after four months. While the word 'failure' may erupt about the program, the undeniable evidence of remaining students' fortitude is their elevated G-2 statuses. The movement towards leaving prison is marked by a determination to never return.

As a cognitive instructor, I want to publically commend each student that passed the test of longevity and character to receive a certificate. Many students who previously would allow fits of rage and indignation to take over their lives, made conscious decisions to not allow emotions to rule the rest of their lives. They made a decision to change.

I feel each student that received a certificate earned it by doing what is necessary to mature by making adult decisions to be personally responsible. "If imprisonment enables nothing else, it affords us time to stop and think," said student K. Hall.   "Are the decisions we are making going to meet our needs over time? If the answer is 'no', and we continue to commit wrong acts, we have sacrificed our reality for fantasy. We have to understand that results take time. We might not receive our penalty for our acts today, but it inevitably is coming."

Hall and others in the class now are writing new chapters in their book of life. They are creating their own happy endings.

What a beautiful way to begin a chapter in a life that was previously littered with pages of pain. It is our hope that all young men and women incarcerated in this state can grasp the importance of changing destructive thoughts in order to achieve that elusive thing that many miss in life… peace of mind and spirit. Change your story. Change your thoughts. Change your life.

 

Reprinted from The ECHO.

 

Other articles that may interest you:

WSD implements training by The Flippen Group for educator development, student leadership - Capturing Kids Hearts (CKH) training by The Flippen Group was recently implemented by Windham School District for staff and students striving for educational achievement and positive life challenges for the district’s youngest students.

Preparing tomorrow's workforce for industry: TIC training manager explains benefits of WSD partnership - "As a company, our partnership with institutions like Windham is imperative because we are so short handed in the industry. We have to look everywhere we can to provide any amount of training that helps us get somebody to where they need to be overall to benefit our company. The training program that WSD has gets them a step closer to where we need them to be.

'One day at a time' - W. Thomas sits on a bench outside the bus station on 12th Street, grinning as he enjoys his first cigarette in two years. Thomas served the past 24 months in a Texas prison for narcotics charges. It's Friday morning and Thomas is one of about 40 former inmates who just walked out of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice's Huntsville "Walls" Unit as free men after paying their debts to society. He's waiting for the Greyhound bus to show up to take him to his hometown of Houston where he intends to begin again.

¡Gracias, Junta de Fideicomisarios (Board of Trustees) de WSD! - El mes de reconocimiento de la Junta Escolar se destaca en enero, pero el Distrito Escolar de Windham agradece a la Junta de Justicia Criminal de Texas por su servicio durante todo el año como su Junta de Fideicomisarios.

Historias de Éxito

NEW - Estoy tan agradecido de haber tomado la clase de soldadura   - "Estoy tan agradecido de haber tomado la soldadura, he llegado tan lejos en mi carrera porque las cosas que me enseñaron en esa programa".

GED ® Historia de éxito   - "Mi hijo recibió su GED ® a través del Distrito Escolar de Windham. Solo quería 'Gracias' por este programa."

NUEVO - Después de más de 16 años   - "Me gradué del programa eléctrico en 1998. Descubrí que mis profesores de Windham eran personas reales, y ellos ..."

Historia de éxito de la Unidad Polunsky  - "Él [Sr. Leblanc] me enseñó cosas que incluso los muchachos que reconstruían transmisiones durante muchos años no sabían".