History

The WSD was established by the Texas Board of Corrections in October 1969, as authorized by the Texas Legislature, to provide educational opportunities to offenders incarcerated in state prisons. WSD was named after James M. Windham, who served on the Texas Board of Corrections for 24 years.

 James M. Windham

The WSD began with a staff of eight instructors and grew along with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ). Today the WSD is one of the largest correctional education systems in the nation, offering a variety of literacy, life skills, vocational and post-secondary classes to eligible offenders incarcerated in the Correctional Institutions Division of the TDCJ.

 

 

Success Stories

Success Story IconInspiration Success Story -
"You are inspiring people you haven’t even met!"

Success Story IconNEW - We can learn and be successful - "My life is proof that we can learn and be successful and stay out of trouble."

Success Story IconCognitive Intervention Success Story -
"I graduated from Cognitive Intervention and the course has had a major impact on me and my behavior".

Success Story Icon NEW - Tools to change my own life - "What can I say about Autobrakes? I guess I need to start by saying it's one of the best classes I have ever taken!"

Calendar

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Teach for WSD

WSD in Images

Offenders often experience academic success for the first time in a Windham classroom.
Students at the Huntsville “Walls” Unit strengthen writing skills during a literacy class.
Female offenders in Gatesville, Texas, study to improve their literacy skills during a WSD academic class.
Auto specialization students in a West Texas prison learn auto maintenance skills, preparing themselves for future employment as professional mechanics.
An offender at the Polunsky Unit prepares for graduation after earning his GED through the Windham School District.
Each day WSD correctional educators pass through prison gates across Texas to work with men and women incarcerated within TDCJ.

Former Student Survey